OPIOID REPLACEMENT THERAPY

For many trying to escape the grips of opioid addiction the physical withdrawal pain is often so great that the attempt to quit "cold turkey" is unsuccessful. Recognizing this we do offer clients the opportunity to participate in an opioid substitution therapy as part of their treatment plan.

Through partnerships with local physicians and clinics clients in need of or already receiving substitution therapy are eligible to participate in Discovery House's live in program.

We have experienced staff who can help clients to set a stabilization plan or a taper plan should that be part of the individual client treatment plan.

For more information or clinic referral please contact Discovery House at: 250-490-3076


Some facts about Opioid Substitution

British Columbia instituted the world's first methadone treatment option in 1959 and the drug has been used to successfully stabilize and/or wean users away from opioid prescription and street drugs (such as heroin, fentanyl, morphine, codeine, Oxycontin, Dilaudid, etc.). In recent years many doctors and clinics have moved toward the safer and more easily accessible treatment using Suboxone.

Methadone treatment for people dependent on opiates relieves their withdrawal symptoms, reduces the physiological cravings and allows their body functions to return to normal. Available since 1959, methadone treatment has been confirmed effective in many scientific studies. Patients receive their medication from qualified health professionals and routinely meet with a primary counselor (social worker, caseworker or certified substance abuse counselor), attend treatment groups, and access medical and social services.

Unlike heroin or other narcotic drugs, methadone does not cause the same “high” associated with drug addiction. When taken as prescribed, long-term administration of methadone causes no adverse effects to vital organs or body systems.

Suboxone (a combination of buprenorphine & naloxone) An newer alternative to methadone treatment which is often considered a safer and more effective alternative to methadone. Since 2016 all B.C. physicians are authorized to prescribe Suboxone, Suboxone is administered in the form of a pill